Mitt Romney & Paul Ryan: A 9/11 Remembrance

US Marine Cpl. Mark Litynski of New Hope, Minnesota, gazes up at One World Trade while visiting the 9/11 Memorial at Ground Zero in New York, on July 4, 2012. Litynski was visiting the memorial with other wounded veterans as a part of a trip organized by the ‘Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers Foundation’, which helps build accessible homes for the wounded veterans. (Photo – Seth Wenig/AP)

September 11, 2001 – September 11, 2012

As life flows forward and we move farther away from that brutal morning of September 11, 2001, we need to take a few moments, or more, to step out of today’s hustle and bustle, lay politics down, and think about today’s anniversary. We would do well to remember there are merciless, remorseless haters in this world who want to kill and do kill Americans and others. We must especially remember on this day, eleven years ago, when caught unawares, those haters brought terror to New York City, Washington D.C., and a field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Within two horrifying hours, 2,977 people would be murdered.

Former MA Governor and GOP Presidential Candidate Mitt Romney today issued the following statement:

“Eleven years ago, evil descended upon our country, taking thousands of lives in an unspeakable attack against innocents. America will never forget those who perished. America will never stop caring for the loved ones they left behind. And America shall remain ever vigilant against those who would do us harm. Today we again extend our most profound gratitude to our brave troops who have gone into battle, some never to return, so that we may live in peace. On this most somber day, those who would attack us should know that we are united, one nation under God, in our determination to stop them and to stand tall for peace and freedom at home and across the world.”

Statement from GOP Vice Presidential candidate Congressman Paul Ryan::

“Eleven years ago today, from Capitol Hill, I could see the smoke rising from the fires burning in the Pentagon. Like all Americans, I will never forget the moment that our homeland came under attack. For me, this is a day to remember those who perished on that day of terror, including the first responders. It is also a day to pay tribute to all those who have worked quietly and tirelessly both on the home front and abroad to prevent a repetition of such terrible events. And it is a day to give honor to those in our military who have sacrificed so much, including their lives, for the same end. Their courage and heroism and willingness to answer the call of duty have kept America safe and strong and free. We are truly the home of the brave.”

Last year, at the tenth anniversary, the National Sept.11 Memorial at Ground Zero opened for visitors. With it’s two impressive, cavernous reflecting pools and renewing waterfalls built in the footprints where the Twin Towers once jutted into New York City clouds, and names of 9/11 and 1993 World Trade Center bombing victims inscribed in bronze surrounding the memorial pools, it’s a sanctuary for remembrance, reflection, and honor. To experience memorial nighttime beauty (inscribed names are backlit), I located a video of Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu and his wife, Sara, visiting the site under the stars in September of last year:

Recapture some of what took place eleven years ago by watching this documentary of phone calls from the Twin Towers here and here. Really, do it.

Besides witholding television ads today, Romney has scaled back his activities:

Romney plans to address the National Guard Association Convention in Reno, Nevada, and campaign staffers in at least six states will collect donations and organize a letter-writing campaign for U.S. troops serving overseas.

Romney’s wife, Ann, is expected to participate in events marking the anniversary in Florida. Romney’s campaign will halt operations in Virginia, home to the Pentagon where 184 people were killed in the al Qaeda attacks.

“Team Virginia will not engage in political activity on September 11th,” Sara Craig, campaign manager in the battleground state, told supporters on Monday.

Today, there will be appropriate ceremonies, moments of silence, and many will offer prayers. We join with our fellow Americans in remembering the 9/11 victims and those who dearly love them, the first responders, firemen, police officers, and Port Authority officers. We remember our fallen and wounded military, including our allies, and those who continue to courageously wage war against terrorism.

What September 11, 2001 memories are most prominent in your mind?

We cannot, must not, ever forget…

UPDATE- Mitt Romney Delivers Remarks To The National Guard Assoc Conference; watch here. (Click below the fold to read transcript.)

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He is Risen! Happy Easter from the Mitt Romney Central Team

UPDATE - Mitt Romney issued the following Easter statement:

“As we take time off of the campaign trail to gather with family and friends this Easter weekend, we celebrate the Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ and the hope which he brought to all of mankind. We are thankful for our brave men and women in uniform who are serving our country in the armed forces and are away from their families on this special day and we pray for their safe return home. And may the hope and promise which we celebrate at Easter remain with all of us throughout the year.”


O, grave… Where is thy victory?

He is risen!

In the end of the sabbath, as it began to dawn toward the first day of the week,
came Mary Magdalene and the other Mary to see the sepulchre.

And, behold, there was a great earthquake:
for the angel of the Lord descended from heaven,
and came and rolled back the stone from the door, and sat upon it.

His countenance was like lightning, and his raiment white as snow:

And for fear of him the keepers did shake, and became as dead men.

And the angel answered and said unto the women,
Fear not ye: for I know that ye seek Jesus, which was crucified.

He is not here: for he is risen, as he said.
Come, see the place where the Lord lay.

And go quickly, and tell his disciples that he is risen from the dead;
and, behold, he goeth before you into Galilee; there shall ye see him: lo, I have told you.

And they departed quickly from the sepulchre with fear and great joy;
and did run to bring his disciples word.

And as they went to tell his disciples, behold, Jesus met them, saying, All hail.

And they came and held him by the feet, and worshipped him.

~ Matthew 28: 1-9

Easter Song – Keith Green:

All Christianity today rejoices!

More celebration in song… To continue click on link below.

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Religion & Romney, Passover & Good Friday, Bigot Hall of Shame & O’Donnell, Rev. Mills

Update - Mitt Romney today made the following statement on Passover:

This Friday night, Jews around the world will join with their families and friends to observe the holiday of Passover. This ancient celebration of freedom reminds us that free people everywhere have a stake in ending oppression. Ann joins me in wishing everyone sitting down for a Passover Seder a joyous time with family and friends.”

April 6, 2012…

It’s an important religious day for Jews and Christians.

Christians in America and across the world are reflecting on the atonement and crucifixion of Jesus Christ. Those of the Jewish faith in America and across the world are observing the first day of Passover.

Today also serves as a bold reminder of the gift of the United States Constitution – wherein religious issues are addressed.

The First Amendment guarantees Americans the freedom of religion. Article VI prohibits the imposition of religious tests as a condition for holding public office. These are our rights. This is the law. Untold treasure and lives have been sacrificed to make it so. Responsible, decent, patriotic American citizens cherish these laws.

Warty political tentacles – whether from the left or the right – are stretching and flexing to selectively choke and kill these guarantees for those with whom they disagree. Yes, as despicable as it is, fellow Americans are actively working to blunt these rights for other Americans.

It’s Un-American. Anti-constitutional. It’s the equivalent of spitting and trampling on the graves of all who have given their lives in the name of freedom.

America – the great religious melting pot of the earth – enables us to celebrate our own religious beliefs while recognizing others are free to do the same. Those living here, enjoying the benefits of our democracy, who seek to deprive the rights of others based on their religious affiliation – whether overtly or covertly – deserve to be shrouded in shame.

I intend to reflect and rejoice on this religious day and I celebrate the opportunity it provides to speak up. Without going in the weeds, I’ve held my thoughts on religious bigotry thus far in this presidential primary, but feel those days have ended. Speakers of religious hate and particularly bigots against Governor Romney’s faith will be outed in Hall of Shame posts. For today, I refer readers to the latest on Article VI blog. They’ve got it covered – but their topics deserve more coverage. Evangelicals for Mitt is another great source. They both have a friend in me.

A final thought before sharing a remembrance for the the day… Those seeking to become United States citizens are REQUIRED to take an Oath of Allegiance:

“I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty of whom or which I have heretofore been a subject or citizen; that I will support and defend the Constitution and laws of the United States of America against all enemies, foreign and domestic . . . “

Are natural born citizens exempt from the same standard?

Maybe religious bigots don’t consider themselves domestic enemies of the Constitution… but, they are. Yes, in the future, I’ll be naming names. It’s that simple – name names and induct them into the Wyatt Hall of Shame. Here are the first two: Lawrence O’Donnell and Santorum endorser Reverend Huey Mills.

Speaking of good – Governor Romney tweeted this today:

Praying for a quick recovery for Bella. Ann and I are keeping Rick, Karen and the entire Santorum family in our thoughts.

My prayers are for little Bella and the Santorums at this time, as well.

Click below the fold for a remembrance…

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September 11th (9-11): We Remember… from Mitt Romney Central

We remember…

Mitt Romney issued the following statement today, on this tenth anniversary of the September 11th attacks:

Ten years ago, we were visited by a human darkness so evil that it plotted and then rejoiced in the murder of innocent lives. We cherish the bright memories of the fallen, and keep our hearts open to the loved ones they left behind. As for those who seek to inflict more harm, understand this: you will never find rest on this earth so long as you threaten our peace and freedom. America will always be strong in defending liberty at home and around the world.

September 11, 2001 ~ September 11, 2011



America is ten years removed from that never-to-be-forgotten September day when mass murder rode in on silver wings…

Peggy Noonan recalls 9-11:

[...] [I]t changed everything. It marked a psychic shift in our town between “safe” and “not safe.” It marked the end of impregnable America and began an age of vulnerability. It marked the end of “we are protected” and the beginning of something else.

When you ask New Yorkers now what they remember, they start with something big—the first news report, the phone call in which someone said, “Turn on the TV.” But then they go to the kind of small thing that when you first saw it you had no idea it would stay in your mind forever. The look on the face of a young Asian woman on Sixth Avenue in the 20s, as she looked upward. The votive candles on the street and the spontaneous shrines that popped up, the pictures of saints. The Xeroxed signs that covered every street pole downtown. A man or a woman in a family picture from a wedding or a birthday or bar mitzvah. “Have you seen Carla? Last seen Tuesday morning in Windows on the World.”

The bus driver as I fumbled in my wallet to find my transit card. “Free rides today,” he mumbled, in a voice on autopilot. The Pompeii-like ash that left a film on everything in town, all the way to the Bronx. The smell of burning plastic that lingered for weeks. A man who worked at Ground Zero told me: “It’s the computers.” They didn’t melt or decompose, and they wouldn’t stop burning. The doctors and nurses who lined up outside St. Vincent’s Hospital with gurneys, thinking thousands would come, and the shock when they didn’t. The spontaneous Dunkirk-like fleet of ferries that took survivors to New Jersey.

The old woman with her grandchild in a stroller. On the stroller she had written a sign in magic marker: “America You Are Not Alone, Mexico Is With You.” She was all by herself in the darkness, on the side of the West Side Highway, as we stood to cheer the workers who were barreling downtown in trucks to begin the dig-out, and to see if they could find someone still alive.
[...]



I remember trying to process the magnitude of events on that surreal day: orange-hot fireballs, raw fear in a sea of eyes, imprint of an airplane wing in the side of one of the twin towers, the look on President Bush’s face when he heard the news, images of nursery school teachers, clutching babes-in-arms, frantically pushing grocery carts filled with toddlers down NYC streets to get to safety, ‘jumpers’ who had to choose between burning to death, being overcome with toxic smoke, or plummeting to the street, collapsing towers, New Yorkers – big men – and policemen and reporters flat out running for their lives, bent over, ash-covered, ghostly people choking and coughing to clear their lungs, waiting ambulances which remained empty, wanting so desperately for passengers on United Airlines Flight 93 to be safe, Barbara Olson’s calm phone call to her husband Ted (she was a passenger on American Airlines Flight 77 which crashed into the pentagon), and the goodness of oh, so many volunteers. An especially poignant memory was the plaintive, high-pitched chirping from the many activated emergency locator devices echoing eerily through the cavernous, debris-strewn NY streets – reminders of the heavy loss of so many firemen. Such a bewildering day of uncertainty, sorrow, and angry resolve… I knew our nation had forever changed.

What 9-11 memories remain with you?




Forever Changed: 9/11 in Remembrance ~ Presented by Jay and Logan Sekulow (full film)
Viewers have the opportunity to observe a few moments of reverence as the names of those who lost their lives scroll at the end of the film…

On this special day, we pause to reflect on the nearly 3,000 individuals who lost their lives so suddenly ten years ago, their loved ones, all the rescuers, and those who currently work to keep us safe – especially our United States military.

May we honor their sacrifice
by doing all we can
to help
God bless America.

Mitt Romney Central



(Border issues can wait for another day.)

Additional links:

In Shanksville, Thousand Gather to Honor Flight 93 Victims

VIDEO: President George W. Bush’s dedicatory remarks / Flight 93 National Memorial Park, Shanksville, PA

Photos of National Sept 11th Memorial/Ground Zero

National 9/11 Pentagon Memorial (scroll down to read Sept 11th events)

Photos – Pentagon 9/11 Memorial

UPDATE – Tweet from Gov Romney:


On this 10th anniversary of 9/11, we cherish the bright memories of the fallen, and keep our hearts open to the loved ones they left behindless than a minute ago via web Favorite Retweet Reply


► Jayde Wyatt

Mitt Romney: Celebrate America’s Greatness (VIDEO), A July 4th Remembrance

It’s Independence Day!

While taking inventory of my fireworks stash (mostly sparklers), I’ve been musing on America’s holiday weekend…

Mitt Romney and Jon Huntsman Jr (and maybe Huntsman’s son) will be at the same July 4th parade in New Hampshire on Monday.

How about the study that suggests Democrats don’t benefit from July 4th parades?

While unfurling a dozen or so various sized American flags to display in my yard, the real significance of Old Glory has weighed on my mind… Mitt Romney’s wonderful new video shares my sentiments; it’s time to celebrate the greatness of America!

Given where our nation stands right now and the emotions swirling ’round my heart, I knew this post wouldn’t be a quick read. Sometimes, the occasion calls for more.

Thoughts take me back to the unforgettable events which would forever change 13 obscure colonies 235 years ago – to the known and unknown individuals that played a part in the great American Revolution

General Washington and his rag-tag Continental Army cross the ice-encrusted Delaware River on Christmas night 1776.

Two-time Pulitzer-Prize-winning author of 1776 and John Adams, David McCullough, writes about the plight of a beaten, but unbowed, General George Washington as he plotted a surprise attack against the British. He would have to move his bedraggled and starved army across the icy Delaware River. It was Christmas Day, 1776:

The Glorious Cause of America

We are taught to honor and celebrate those great men who wrote and voted for the Declaration of Independence in Philadelphia. But none of what they committed themselves to—their lives, their fortunes, their sacred honor—none of those noble words about life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, about all men being created equal, none of that would have been worth any more than the paper it was written on had it not been for those who were fighting to make it happen. We must remember them, too, and especially those who seem nameless: Jabez Fitch and Joseph Hodgkins; little John Greenwood, who was all of 16 years old; and Israel Trask, who was 10 years old. There were boys marching with the troops as fifers or drummers or messenger boys, not just Nathanael Greene and Henry Knox and John Glover and George Washington. And they were in rags—they were in worse than rags. The troops had no winter clothing. The stories of men leaving bloody footprints in the snow are true—that’s not mythology.

Washington was trying to get his army across the Delaware River, to put the river between his army and the oncoming British army, which was very well equipped, very well fed, very well trained—the best troops in the world led by an extremely able officer, Cornwallis. On they were coming, and they were going to end the war. But Washington felt that if he could just get across the river, get what men he had left over on the Pennsylvania shore on the western side, destroy any boats the British might use to come chasing across the river, that they’d have time to collect themselves and maybe get some extra support. Again they went across at night. Again it was John Glover and his men who made it happen. They lit huge bonfires on the Pennsylvania side of the river to light the crossing.

While encamped on the snowy banks of the Delaware, some of Washington’s faithful destitute soldiers didn’t survive.

The creator of the following video writes that on a cold December day, he took his son to holy ground on the banks of the Delaware River. It is there you will find casualties who were not able to make The Crossing in 1776. Whether because of sickness or cold or injury they gave their lives for a nation which was not yet formed. This is meant to be a thought provoking 5 minute reflection, [...] to see a memorial to unknown soldiers we owe so much at a place which many know nothing about.”

McCullough continues:

Washington took stock[...] Most everybody concluded that the war was over and we had lost. It was the only rational conclusion one could come to. There wasn’t a chance. So Washington did what you sometimes have to do when everything is lost and all hope is gone. He attacked.
[...]
He had the nerve, the courage, the faith in the cause to carry the war once more to the enemy. After the crossing, they marched nine miles back down the river on the eastern side and struck at Trenton the next morning.

It was a bloody, fierce, 45 minute house-to-house battle. When the shouts and screams died down, our Continental boys prevailed. They won. It was a transforming turning point in our nation’s history.

Conclusion:

Continental Soldier U.S. Revolutionary War

In conclusion, I want to share a scene that took place on the last day of the year of 1776, Dec. 31. All the enlistments for the entire army were up. Every soldier, because of the system at the time, was free to go home as of the first day of January 1777. Washington called a large part of the troops out into formation. He appeared in front of these ragged men on his horse, and he urged them to reenlist. He said that if they would sign up for another six months, he’d give them a bonus of 10 dollars. It was an enormous amount then because that’s about what they were being paid for a month—if and when they could get paid. These were men who were desperate for pay of any kind. Their families were starving.

The drums rolled, and he asked those who would stay on to step forward. The drums kept rolling, and nobody stepped forward. Washington turned and rode away from them. Then he stopped, and he turned back and rode up to them again. This is what we know he said:

My brave fellows, you have done all I asked you to do, and more than could be reasonably expected, but your country is at stake, your wives, your houses, and all that you hold dear. You have worn yourselves out with fatigues and hardships, but we know not how to spare you. If you will consent to stay one month longer, you will render that service to the cause of liberty, and to your country, which you can probably never do under any other circumstance.

Again the drums rolled. This time the men began stepping forward. “God Almighty,” wrote Nathanael Greene, “inclined their hearts to listen to the proposal and they engaged anew.”

(emphasis added)
The eight year war for independence came down to this; the British were fighting for a king – the vastly outnumbered Americans were fighting for liberty and their lives.

Flags in my yard are all dancing in the breeze now. As the stars and stripes wave, my heart overflows with gratitude and celebration for the named and unnamed who have sacrificed through the years so we could breathe freedom’s air.

Old Glory Anthem (worthy of a full-screen view) Long may she wave!


This weekend, when we see Old Glory flying and thrill to fireworks’ boom, let’s especially remember those courageous, tough, long-ago patriots who took the musket balls, who felt the bayonet’s slash, who starved and froze in mud and snow, who marched endless miles with feet swathed in bloody rags, who suffered every privation, who lost limb and life, who pressed on – daring to defy a king, our heroes who brought forth the United States of America.

Happy Birthday, America!

Happy 4th of July, everyone!

from all of us at MRC




► Jayde Wyatt