To Gary Johnson Voters, Ron Paul & Other ‘Write-In’ Voters: Supreme Court Consequences

A front view of the four story, marble-clad United States Supreme Court Building in Washington, D.C.
Click on photo to enlarge. (Photo – Mark Fischer)

To: Those intent on voting for Gary Johnson, Ron Paul supporters, and other ‘write-in’ voters…

Take a moment to read the following IMPORTANT article from Matthew D. Carling, Esq. He lays out the case for thoughtfully considering the repercussions of your voting choices. For years to come, America’s course will be determined through coming Supreme Court appointees.

Carling’s background:

Matthew D. Carling is an attorney specializing in appellate law in the states of Utah and Nevada. He has previously been a prosecutor for the District Attorney’s Office of Lincoln County, Nevada, has served as a defense attorney, and also as Judge Pro Tempore for the North Las Vegas Municipal Courts. He received both his Juris Doctor and Master’s of Business Administration from Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska.

(Carling has given permission to reprint his article in full.)

The Purist Vote: How Obama’s Foes Might Extend His Legacy for Decades
November 1, 2012
By Matthew D. Carling, Esq.

(or) The Purist Vote: American Conservatives Playing Russian Roulette

Every four years, American voters eagerly line up to choose their favorite candidate for President. We brim with hope for a leader who sees the world like we do—someone a lot like us. But once our ideal contender is eliminated from the field, disappointment often turns to disgust. Voters by the thousands remove themselves from the political battlefield and refuse to participate further. It’s either my nominee or nothing.

Consoled in the belief that one vote won’t matter, the disenfranchised gently beguile themselves into apathy. Surely four more years of any single administration cannot possibly unravel the rich heritage of our nation. Others withdraw out of a need to take a moral stand, indignant over the flaws they would otherwise feel they are endorsing with their vote. Some even choose strategic revenge, hoping to punish less-pure conservatives with four more years under a stanch liberal president — a small price to pay if the lesson finally awakens such “useful idiots” from their folly. After all, how much damage can one president leave that can’t be undone by his successor?

These might be valid points except for one detail. A president’s most lasting legacy is not usually the bills he signs into law, his executive orders or even the wars over which he presides. It is his unique role in shaping the entire third branch of government, the Supreme Court, which has power to overrule the others. Indeed, his nominations to the bench can alter our society for generations.

Consider George W. Bush. With the retirement of Justice O’Connor and the passing of Chief Justice Rehnquist, President Bush reshaped the Court with his nominations of John Roberts and Samuel Alito, both thoughtful and mostly conservative jurists. Whatever Bush’s faults, these two acts could benefit our nation immensely for generations to come. President Obama, on the other hand, countered by replacing two activist jurists (Souter & Stevens) with two more: Elena Kagen and Sonia Sotomayor, each fully in step with the current Administration’s societal and political agenda. These appointments have not disappointed the progressive left.

How much does this matter? For most people it depends on the issue. Until recently, for millions of Americans in major cities across the nation, owning a handgun was severely restricted if not banned entirely. For decades, Second Amendment advocates had wistfully dreamed of the Supreme Court striking such laws, but were afraid to bring forth a case. What if they lost? Might the Court instead end up nullifying the Second Amendment? On June 28, 2010, with Bush’s appointees the Court finally acknowledged the original intent: that no government, whether federal, state or local, may deny a citizen the right to keep and bear arms.[i] The victory, however, was a narrow one—only 5 to 4. If one more left leaning justice had been appointed, it would have gone the other way. Dissenting, Justice Stevens argued that owning a personal firearm was not a “liberty” interest protected by the Constitution. Likewise, Justice Stephen Breyer stated, “the Framers did not write the Second Amendment in order to protect a private right of armed self-defense.” With a single vote, this suppressive notion would have been the majority opinion.

In just the last decade, this same narrow margin has preserved school choice laws at the state level, but unfortunately tipped the other way and failed to roll back eminent domain abuse. The constitution’s safety in the court is fragile indeed.

Don’t stop now. Click here!

Romney Leads in Polls: FOX News, Public Policy Polling, American Research Group (ARG)


It’s been a good polling news day for Mitt Romney!

After the three presidential debates this month, a national poll by FOX News, polling in Florida, and polling in Iowa shows that debates matter. Voters prefer Governor Romney:

Fox News Poll: GOP Race Top Tier Now Romney, Perry and Cain

Three September debates have shaken-up the race for the Republican presidential nomination. Herman Cain has jumped into the top tier. Rick Perry’s stumbled. Mitt Romney’s holding steady.

And Michele Bachmann is hitting bottom. That’s according to a Fox News poll released Wednesday.

The new poll found Cain’s support has nearly tripled among GOP primary voters to 17 percent.

That’s up from 6 percent before this month’s debates, and puts him in what is essentially a three-way tie with Perry and Romney.

Click here to see the full results from the poll.

Perry now garners 19 percent, a drop of 10 percentage points from a month ago. That puts Romney back in the top spot with the support of 23 percent. Last month Romney was at 22 percent.

Newt Gingrich recovered some ground and now stands at 11 percent. Ron Paul receives the backing of 6 percent now compared to 8 percent before the September debates. Bachmann registers 3 percent support, down from 8 percent in late August and a high of 15 percent in July.

The nomination preference question included only the names of announced candidates.
[...]
Republicans are much happier with the GOP field these days. The number saying they are at least somewhat impressed with their slate of candidates has increased 19 points — from 44 percent in April to 63 percent now.
[...]
Hypothetical, Early Matchups
[...]
Among all registered voters Obama tops Romney by 3 points, which is within the poll’s margin of sampling error. In July, Obama had a 6-point edge and a year ago it was 1-point. The strength of party support is similar for each, as 85 percent of Democrats back Obama and 83 percent of Republicans support Romney.

Romney tops Obama among independents by a slim 2 points. In a head-to-head matchup with Perry, Obama bests him by 8 points among all voters, and by 6 points among independents.

Romney Up in Florida – Public Policy Polling:


Rick Perry’s led the Republican field in every Southern state that we’ve polled since he entered the Presidential race…until now. Mitt Romney continues to lead the way in Florida with 30% to 24% for Perry, 10% for Gingrich, 8% for Ron Paul, 7% for Herman Cain, 6% for Michele Bachmann, 3% for Jon Huntsman, 2% for Rick Santorum, and 1% for Gary Johnson.

Perry had a poor debate performance in Florida Thursday night and our results suggest that the negative coverage he received from that did hurt him some in the state. We started this poll on Thursday night before the debate and in those interviews the race was neck and neck with Romney at 33% and Perry at 31%. But in interviews done Friday-Sunday Romney’s lead expanded to double digits at 29-19. More telling might be what happened to Perry’s favorability numbers after the debate- on Thursday night he was at 63/23 with Florida Republicans. Friday-Sunday he was at 48/36. Perry’s poor performance may or may not prove to be a game changer nationally but it definitely appears to have hurt his image in the key state where it occurred.

If the Republican Presidential race came down to just Rick Perry and Mitt Romney, who would you vote for?

Mitt Romney 45%
Rick Perry 36%
Not sure 19%


Iowa – Romney Leads in Latest Poll (ARG)

A poll out on Wednesday from the American Research Group has Mitt Romney leading the Republican primary field in Iowa, picking up 22 percent of the support of Iowa Republicans and 21 percent of likely caucus goers. Among likely Republican caucus goers, Michele Bachmann has 15 percent and Rick Perry is in third just behind with 14 percent. Bachmann won the Ames Straw Poll and had been leading ARG’s poll in July, 21 percent to Romney’s 18 percent. (Perry barely registered back then at 2 percent.) In the intervening months, it looks like Perry’s picking up some of her former supporters, but not enough yet to boost him past Romney. Meanwhile, Herman Cain, who led the weekend’s Florida straw poll, picked up just 6 percent of the support among likely caucus goers.

Mitt Romney – 22%
Michele Bachmann – 15%
Rick Perry – 14%
Herman Cain – 6%

(emphasis added to articles )

► Jayde Wyatt

Mitt Romney Central: Google, FOX News, RPOF Presidential Debate Details

JOIN US IN THE CHAT ROOM TO DISCUSS THE DEBATE LIVE

Gov Mitt Romney shakes hands with Rick Perry at the GOP CNN Tea Party presidential debate held in Tampa, FL on Sept 12, 2011. FOX News, Google, and the Republican Party of Florida are hosting tonight's presidential debate in Orlando, FL.


Mitt Romney supporters are geared up for a rousing GOP presidential debate tonight in Orlando, Florida!


Bret Baier, debate moderator, reported today on FOX News that when Rick Perry toured the debate venue, he told Baier that he was the target at the last debate (his first debate) but “they oughta get ready because I’m comin’ after ‘em tonight.”


We have no doubt that the participants are prepared and looking forward to it – especially Governor Romney.

Details:

Sponsors: Republican Party of Florida, FOX News, Google

Time: 9:00 PM – 11:00 PM ET, FOX News pre-debate show 8:30 PM ET

Location: Orange County Convention Center, Orlando, FL

Moderator: Bret Baier, anchor of Special Report, FOX News.

Panelists: Chris Wallace, host of FOX News Sunday, Megyn Kelly, anchor of America Live, Shannon Bream, FOX News contributor (Note: Text questions and questions submitted prior to the debate on YouTube will also be part of the proceedings.)

Candidates: Rep. Michele Bachmann, Gov. Rick Perry, former Sen. Rick Santorum, former Gov. Mitt Romney, Rep. Ron Paul, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, Herman Cain, former Gov. Jon Huntsman and former Gov. Gary Johnson. (Fox News invited Johnson to the debate despite objections by the Florida Republican Party.)

FOX News reported today that all the candidates have toured the debate venue. In this video from yesterday, Bret Baier gives us a behind-the-scenes look:


Viewing/listening options:

TV – FOX News Channel (FNC)

Live Stream – FOXNews.com and YouTube.com/FOXNews,

FOX News Radio

FOX News Mobile

Post-debate viewing:

“Hannity” will follow at 11 ET. Host Sean Hannity will talk to five Republican presidential candidates: Romney, Bachmann, Gingrich, Paul and Cain.

The debate and “Hannity” will be repeated from midnight to 3 a.m. Friday and again from 3 to 6 a.m.

As the debate gets underway this evening, we invite Romney supporters to join us here on MRC chat!

GO MITT!


► Jayde Wyatt

Mitt Romney is Right Not Signing the Family Leader’s Pledge

Mitt Romney caught flack for not signing the Susan B. Anthony List’s pledge. However, at the end of the day, the former governor of Massachusetts showed his wisdom in not signing the pledge. (Governor Romney wrote his own pro-life pledge.)

Now, a false controversy is being created over Romney’s decline to sign the The Family Leader’s pledge. If there is any controversy here, it’s the fact that Michele Bachmann and Rick Santorum were stupid enough to quickly sign the pledge – before the provision containing slavery language was dropped:

A social conservative Iowa group has retracted language regarding slavery from the opening of a presidential candidates’ pledge, amid a growing controversy over the document that Michele Bachmann had signed and Rick Santorum committed to.

The original “marriage vow” from the Family Leader, unveiled last week, included a line at the opening of its preamble, which suggested that black children born into slavery were better off in terms of family life than African-American kids born today.

“Slavery had a disastrous impact on African-American families, yet sadly a child born into slavery in 1860 was more likely to be raised by his mother and father in a two-parent household than was an African-American baby born after the election of the USA?s first African-American President,” read the preamble.

But this evening, amid growing questions aimed at Bachmann, Family Leader officials said they’d removed the slavery language from the preamble.
“After careful deliberation and wise insight and input from valued colleagues we deeply respect, we agree that the statement referencing children born into slavery can be misconstrued, and such misconstruction can detract from the core message of the Marriage Vow: that ALL of us must work to strengthen and support families and marriages between one woman and one man,” the group’s officials said in a statement. “We sincerely apologize for any negative feelings this has caused, and have removed the language from the vow.”
Just as Romney was correct in not signing the SBA pledge, he was wise in refusing to sign the Family Leader’s pledge even with the slavery provision removed from the language of the document:

Mitt Romney strongly supports traditional marriage but he felt this pledge contained references and provisions that were undignified and inappropriate for a presidential campaign,” said campaign spokeswoman Andrea Saul late Tuesday night.

Governor Romney has also released a statement from State Representative Renee Schulte of Cedar Rapids, Iowa:

One of the reasons I support Gov. Romney is his support for traditional marriage,” Schulte’s statement said. “However, I am glad he won’t sign this ill-advised pledge. The Family Leader would do more to advance the issues that conservatives like Mitt and I support if they kept it simple.”

Romney was the first 2012 candidate to refuse to sign the pledge. Newt Gingrich and Gary Johnson have said they will not sign the pledge. Tim Pawlenty, Ron Paul and Herman Cain are still determining if they will sign the pledge.

Unlike Michele Bachmann and Rick Santorum who didn’t read the fine print before supporting the pledge, Romney did read the fine print and rejected it.

If candidates have difficulty reading or ignoring fine print, then they’re not judicious enough to be President. We already have politicians who are willing to vote for a bill just to find out what’s in it. America shouldn’t elect a President who makes a promise without knowing what he or she is promising, i.e., doesn’t read the fine print.

That’s why we need Mitt Romney in the White House. He actually reads documentation before signing the dotted line.

UPDATE: Tim Pawlenty has declined to sign the pledge.