Mitt Romney’s Vision & Plan Will Lift All Americans


In the 2008 election, Barack Obama received 95 percent of the black vote. 95 percent! That is astonishing! Many experts believe he will receive that same level of support this year. I don’t think so at all. Barack Obama’s pro-abortion stance along with his reversal against traditional marriage was too much for many in the black community. For many, their values trumped race.

Photographer Unknown

Last night a great American gave me a ride in his taxi. He was born in Haiti and came to America for a better life. I asked him if he was going to vote Tuesday and for whom and he told me he was voting for Obama. I asked why and he replied, “Because all my friends are voting for him.” After a three minute discussion about the facts listed below along with my explanation that the economy would improve drastically under a Mitt Romney presidency, he told me he would cast his vote for Romney. I asked him to visit this site with his friends and help them to understand as he now does.

The WSJ’s editorial board member Jason Riley published an op-ed yesterday entitled, For Blacks, the Pyrrhic Victory of the Obama Era:

Four years ago, 95% of black voters went for Mr. Obama, and he is likely to win something approaching that percentage in his re-election bid, notwithstanding economic data showing that blacks have lost ground on his watch. When the president assumed office, unemployment was 12.7% for blacks and 7.1% for whites. Today it is 14.3% for blacks and 7% for whites, which means that the black-white employment gap has not merely persisted under Mr. Obama but widened.

No matter. The president’s approval rating among African-Americans is pushing 90%, and a Washington Post/ABC News tracking poll last week found that 97% of blacks plan to double down on him in this election. Racial pride surely plays some part in these attitudes, as does traditional black support of Democratic presidential candidates over the past four decades. But another factor is the abiding belief among civil-rights leaders that political activity is essential for black upward mobility.

Long after the passage of landmark civil-rights legislation, black leaders have continued to focus on integrating political institutions to redress social and economic problems. Demands for black access to the ballot have morphed into demands for “safe” black seats in Congress and “proportionate” representation among elected officials. Mr. Obama’s victory in 2008 was the ultimate realization of this thinking. The Rev. C.T. Vivian, a close associate of Martin Luther King Jr., told Obama biographer David Remnick that King was a “prophet,” and the “politician of our age, who comes along to follow that prophet, is Barack Obama. Martin laid the moral and spiritual base for the political reality to follow.”

Photographer Unknown

Riley goes on to illustrate how political involvement in America by German and Irish immigrants had little effect on their economic prosperity.

Today, Asian-Americans are the nation’s best-educated and highest-earning racial group. According to a Pew study released earlier this year, 49% of Asians age 25 and older hold bachelor’s degrees, compared with 31% of whites and 18% of blacks. The median household income for Asians is $66,000, which is $12,000 more than white households and double that of black households. As with other groups, political clout has not been a precondition of Asian socioeconomic advancement.

There are a handful of prominent Asian-American politicians today, including Govs. Bobby Jindal of Louisiana and Nikki Haley of South Carolina, but Asians have tended to avoid politics compared with other groups. Between 1990 and 2000, for example, the number of elected officials grew by 23% for blacks but only by 4% for Asians. In 2008, Asians were significantly less likely than both blacks and whites to have voted.

The election of Barack Obama four years ago gave blacks bragging rights, but bragging rights can’t close the black-white achievement gap in education or increase black labor-force participation or reduce black incarceration rates. A civil-rights leadership that encourages blacks to look to politicians to solve these problems is doing a disservice to the people they claim to represent.

Asians, for their part, can point to an out-of-wedlock birthrate of just 16%, the lowest of any major group and a significant factor in Asian success. The black illegitimacy rate last year was 72%. Might it be that having a black man in the Oval Office is less important for black advancement than having one in the home?

The political scientists tell us that Mr. Obama will almost certainly need every black vote he can muster on Election Day. Less certain is whether blacks need him.

[emphasis added]

I believe today, far more African American voters will join women voters in their support of Mitt Romney than the politicos expect. Democrats love to divide and separate Americans into groups and classes, patronize them, and assume they will not think for themselves. Not this time.

Mitt Romney’s vision and plan will lift all Americans. African Americans and women will benefit far more extensively under President Romney by comparison to the failed policies of President Obama. It is a travesty that unemployment among women and blacks is at some of the highest levels in American history. Mitt Romney will begin to change that trend in January.


American Values: “In God We Trust” — “Liberty” — “E Pluribus Unum”

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Pastor Receives Death Threats after Saying he Will Not Vote for Obama This Time (#Video)

Pastor Phillip Goudeaux


Pastor Phillip Goudeaux, who oversees a congregation of 20,000 in Sacramento, California, voted for Barack Obama in 2008. This time around, he’s not.

For refusing to support Obama, Goudeaux has received death threats.

Due to the auto-start feature on this video, we’e linked it here.

Twitter Follow: @VicLundquist – Dedicated to all members of The United States military and their families