Romney-Ryan Go on Offense With New Ad That Exposes Obama For Cutting Medicare to Fund ObamaCare

Team Romney released a new television advertisement today, titled “Paid In.”

With every paycheck, Americans paid more and more into Medicare. Now, when you need it most, President Obama cut Medicare to pay for Obamacare. Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan will strengthen Medicare and protect the commitments made to current seniors.

View the ad below, then share this post to every senior citizen you know to get the truth out about Medicare.

Romney and Congressman Paul Ryan Discuss Debt Crisis, Entitlements

Romney and Ryan…

According to Congressman Paul Ryan (R-WI), he and Governor Romney spent time together last Thursday (Oct. 27) when Romney was in Washington D.C. They discussed entitlement reform and our federal debt.

TheStateColumn.com

Speaking Tuesday, Mr. Ryan said the meeting was focused on issues pertaining to Social Security reform and the nation’s growing debt crisis.

I spent an hour with Romney on Thursday,” Mr. Ryan said. The Wisconsin Republican said the two discussed about entitlements reform and Republican proposals aimed to limiting costs associated with Social Security programs.

“I think he gets the situation, and I think he’s serious about fixing it if elected.”

John McCormack from The Weekly Standard asked Ryan about his meeting with The Gov, pointing out that Ryan had previously been somewhat critical of Romneycare:

[Ryan] says the issue is irrelevant. “I don’t think this question matters that much anymore because Romney’s been very clear that he’s against Obamacare and he’s going to repeal it. So I for a second don’t worry about whether he’s going to shy away from repealing the president’s health care law.”

Ryan also said this about Romney:

He keeps winning these debate tests. He’s pretty capable and strong and resilient in those things.”

(emphasis added)

Congressman Ryan is the ranking Republican on the House Budget Committee. The Republican National Committee has delegated him to fundraising for the eventual nominee, so he won’t be endorsing anyone during the primary.


Last week, the day before he met with Romney, Congressman Ryan spoke to a gathering at The Heritage Foundation:

Saving the American Idea: Rejecting Fear, Envy and the Politics of Division

► Jayde Wyatt

New Romney Social Security Video: Two Different Plans, Romney “Reform” Perry “Send to States”

Romney for President has released another eye-catching video today. “Two Different Plans” highlights the devastating effect Rick Perry’s proposal for Social Security could have on the state of Florida:

Two Different Plans

A ROMNEY FOR PRESIDENT WHITE PAPER

Governor Rick Perry has proposed that Social Security be turned over to the states. But transferring the program’s fiscal challenges to states already facing severe budget crises of their own will only make matters worse, especially in those states with relatively high numbers of Social Security beneficiaries. While Perry has not yet provided an explanation of his proposal that would allow a thorough evaluation of its specific contours, an initial assessment can be made on the basis of the ideas that he has outlined.

On the same day this white paper was first released, Perry advanced a new claim, that “we never said that we were going to move this back to the states. What we said was, we ought to have as one of the options the state employees and the state retirees, they being able to go off of the current system, on to one that the states would operate themselves.” Such an assertion is plainly inconsistent with the proposal he has previously advanced, and only raises further questions that are included in this updated version of the paper.

This white paper has two goals: first, to identify the questions that must be addressed before Perry’s proposal can be properly understood and thoroughly analyzed; second, to use what information is available about the proposal to estimate its possible effects on various states.

The paper considers four states — Florida, Iowa, Arizona, and Louisiana — and assesses the budgetary impacts of a basic plan under which each state is responsible for funding its own Social Security program out of its own tax revenues. The findings are as follows:

Florida could face a $16 billion shortfall, requiring it to either:

  • Reduce the scale of its program by removing more than one million recipients or cutting benefits per recipient by more than $4,000;
  • Make dramatic cuts elsewhere in its budget, such as elimination of its public education and prison systems; or
  • Raise taxes.


    IA could face a $1.5 billion shortfall — more than 25% of its general fund.

    AZ could face a nearly $3 billion shortfall — more than 33% of its general fund.

    LA could face a $1 billion shortfall — more than 10% of its general fund.

    Methodology, assumptions, and illustrative calculations are provided in an appendix to the paper. As Perry provides additional details about his proposal, these projections can be refined.

  • Read The Full Romney For President White Paper Below:



    ► Jayde Wyatt

    Romney Interviewed by NH Eagle Tribune, Will Work to Make USA Best For JOBS


    Mitt Romney sat down with members of the New Hampshire Eagle Tribune editorial board last week. They shared about an hour together.

    The Gov spoke about the economy, foreign policy, Obamacare and MA private-market insurance, Social Security and Medicare, national defense, and trade. He also spoke about wisdom gained from political losses…

    Mitt Romney gets down to business

    Oct 2, 20121 – By John Toole

    Romney wants to help business. In helping business, he thinks the United States will grow jobs and find its way out of the current economic mess.

    I understand how business works and am intent on making this the most attractive place for enterprise, small and large,” Romney said. “I want America to be the most pro-business, pro-investment, pro-jobs nation in the world.”

    Romney, 64, is the former governor of Massachusetts, a man who once led the Olympic games in the U.S. He met with The Eagle-Tribune editorial board for more than an hour last week to talk about his run for president.

    Romney admits he is a different candidate than the one who lost to John McCain four years ago in the 2008 race for the Republican nomination.

    “You learn from losses,” Romney said.

    He learned not only from his loss to McCain, but also his loss in a Senate race to Ted Kennedy, he said.
    “I’m one of those hard learners,” Romney said. “I’ve got to lose once or twice to figure out what to do right.”

    What he’s learned is that, unlike business, a lot of what happens in politics is out of your control. He’s learned, too, to deliver a clear message. Romney said a candidate has to say what he believes, express his convictions, describe his experience.

    “If the American people want that group of qualities, then you get elected,” Romney said. “If they don’t, you don’t.”

    The political lessons have enabled him to, in his words, be a little more calm. He knows he has a great life, a great wife, children and grandchildren who love him. There’s always business, too.

    I’m focused on telling people what I believe, honestly and directly,” Romney said. “If they like it, wonderful.”

    Besides, Romney thinks the time is right for him.

    “Today the issue America cares about most is the economy,” Romney said. “It’s a time which is more geared to someone for whom the economy is their wheelhouse, like me.”

    Romney said he is worried about the country’s future.

    Mitt and Ann Romney with some of their grandchildren, Dec 2010. (click to enlarge)

    “I’m really concerned for my grandkids,” Romney said. “Kids in their early teens and younger. What will America be like for them? Will there be jobs there?”

    There are tough challenges ahead, he said, but the American people not only are up to the challenges, they will welcome the sacrifices to meet them. That means working together, working longer and harder, taking risks, he said.

    “As a people, we like being called to do something great,” Romney said. “Politicians have been getting elected by promising free stuff. …

    Romney said he believes the people are looking for a leader to restore America to greatness.

    On the Obama economy:

    “I think they are badly disappointed with this president,” Romney said. “He’s been a disappointment. Both internationally he’s failed and domestically.”

    Unemployment is extremely high and in one term President Obama has stacked up as much debt as all other presidents combined, Romney said.

    “It’s a presidency that is now casting about to blame somebody,” Romney said.

    He has no use for a second stimulus from Obama.

    “It’s too late for a stimulus,” he said. “We need a fundamental restructuring of America’s economy to make sure we’re a competitive economy that attracts employers, investment, entrepreneurs and jobs.”
    Romney would build economic recovery around seven categories, what he describes as “the seven habits of highly effective economies.”

    He would lower taxes on business.

    “I’d bring our corporate employer tax rates down at least to the level of competing nations,” Romney said.

    He would loosen regulation to encourage free enterprise, rather than burden it.

    “Streamline, update, modernize regulation and get regulators to see business as their friend and their ally,” Romney said.

    CEOs have told Romney that paying taxes and complying with regulatory policies, as well as energy expenses, cost them nearly 18 percent more here than doing business in foreign countries.

    On foreign trade:

    Romney wants more foreign trade, agreements with other nations to open more markets. He wants to crack down on competitor nations that unfairly undercut America.

    “China is cheating,” Romney said. “You have to say, ‘stop.‘”

    (emphasis added ) Read the entire interview here.

    Romney during an Eagle-Tribune editorial board meeting (Sept 29, 2011):


    ► Jayde Wyatt

    Romney’s Six Questions to Ask Rick Perry on Social Security


    When a presidential candidate is asked about an issue they tout, while appearing on a national forum, and they reply with “let’s have a conversation” (as Rick Perry did on Social Security at the last presidential debate) what does that mean? That they have hyped a problem and are short on solutions? Do they want to ‘test the waters’ before figuring out a plan?

    Tonight’s presidential debate in Orlando, Florida, is the perfect setting to ask Rick Perry for details on his stance on Social Security.

    From MittRomney.com:

    In advance of Thursday’s debate in Orlando, the Romney for President campaign released a series of questions for Governor Rick Perry about his proposal to “let the states [decide] how to run the pensions.” Questions about Perry’s proposal to return Social Security to the states have so far gone unanswered.

    This election is about choices and voters – and voters will have the opportunity to choose between Mitt Romney, who wants to fix and strengthen Social Security for the next generation, and Rick Perry, who wants to dismantle it. Voters are now learning more about Rick Perry’s position on Social Security and find it troubling that he has refused to answer questions on what the Social Security program would look like at the state level, as Rick Perry suggests. Governor Perry has the opportunity to clarify his proposal while he is in Florida – a state with an extraordinarily high number of retirees and near retirees,” said Gail Gitcho, Romney Communications Director.

    (emphasis added)

    Six Questions for Rick Perry on Returning Social Security to the States

    1. Constitutionality: Perry has asserted that a federally run Social Security program is unconstitutional. If this remains his position, it suggests that the program must be devolved to the states notwithstanding the advisability of such an approach. The first question in understanding Perry’s approach must be whether he believes there is no choice but to devolve or, alternatively, if he believes it is the right policy solution.

    2. Unfunded Liabilities: Devolving the program to the states does not address underlying fiscal challenges. Where a single program once faced possible insolvency, there would now be fifty. How would Perry suggest a state such as Texas address this challenge? Should it raise taxes, reduce benefits, or pursue other types of reform?

    3. Trust Fund Accounting: What would happen to the Trust Fund that accrued while the system was in surplus? Interest payments from the fund and draw-down on the principal are crucial funding streams for the national system that are unavailable to the states. How would those funds be equitably allocated to the states?

    4. Mobility: How would a state-by-state system accommodate the enormous number of Americans who move across state lines during their lives, and especially as retirement nears? Would each state be responsible for supporting its current disabled and elderly population on its current payroll? Would funds paid into the system in one state follow a resident to another state later in life?

    5. State Obligations: Would states be free to forego a pension program altogether? If so, what if any provision would be made for the disabled and elderly in that state? Or would they be expected to move to other states with more generous benefits, inevitably overwhelming those systems?

    6. Administration: Would individuals retain national Social Security numbers or would each state administer its own system? Would individuals have any guarantee that commitments made during their working life are honored in retirement? Who would pay for the added expense associated with administering fifty programs instead of one?

    Perry wrote in his book Fed UP! that social security is unconstitutional. So, is Perry going to support a program he believes is unconstitutional? I hope Mitt zings him on this.

    Mitt Romney Rules Out Rick Perry’s Idea Of Moving Social Security To States – Sept 21, 2011

    WASHINGTON — Mitt Romney’s campaign said Wednesday it has ruled out the idea, floated by fellow Republican presidential candidate Rick Perry, of moving Social Security to the state level.

    We reject turning the program over to the states,” Romney adviser Eric Fehrnstrom told The Huffington Post in an email.


    ► Jayde Wyatt

    UPDATE from MittRomney.com
    HOW MANY WAYS CAN RICK PERRY BE WRONG ON SOCIAL SECURITY?

    “I Haven’t Backed Off Anything In My Book. So Read The Book Again And Get It Right.” (Los Angeles Times, 8/29/11)

    Latest Edition:

    · Perry Says Republicans Agree Social Security Is “Wrong.” PERRY: “Republicans have identified that Social Security is wrong.” (Fox News’ “Hannity,” 9/21/11)

    Previous Editions:

    · “Let The States Do It…” PERRY: “When you look at Social Security, it’s broke. … Get it back to the states. Why is the federal government even in the pension program or the health care delivery program? Let the states do it.” (MSNBC’s “Morning Joe,” 11/5/10)

    · “At The Expense Of Respect For The Constitution…” PERRY: “Social Security is something that we’ve been forced to accept for more than 70 years now … at the expense of respect for the Constitution and limited government.” (Rick Perry, Fed Up!, 2010, p. 50)

    · A Program “We Don’t Need…” PERRY: “I think every program needs to stand the sunshine of righteous scrutiny. Whether it’s Social Security, whether it’s Medicaid, whether it’s Medicare. You’ve got $115 trillion worth of unfunded liability in those three. … And I think we should have a legitimate, honest, national discussion about Washington’s continuing to spend money we don’t have on programs that we don’t need.” (Andrew Romano, “Rick Perry On The Record,” The Daily Beast, 8/12/11)

    · “A Failure…” PERRY: “By any measure, Social Security is a failure.” (Rick Perry, Fed Up, 2010, p. 62)

    · “Let The States … Run The Pensions.” PERRY: “There’s a number of things in that book that will strike Americans as horrifying. And we must, as a people, get put back in the box. Get this government back to the limited form that our founding fathers sought. Let the states, whether it is how to run Medicaid, how to run the pensions.” (FOX’s “On The Record With Greta Van Susteren,” 11/8/10)

    Romney Invests Full Day of Campaigning in Arizona, Big Crowd

    Mitt Romney stands on a chair to address the standing-room-only crowd at a town hall meeting at Sun Lakes retirement community near Chandler, AZ. 9/14/11


    Reeling from the Obamanomics punch to their economy, especially in their housing market, Arizona residents were happy to welcome Mitt Romney to their state. They turned out in large numbers.

    After hosting a round table meeting at a car dealership in Tucson, Romney headed to Sun Lakes, a retirement community located near Chandler, where he hosted a standing-room-only town hall meeting. Later in the evening, a fundraiser was held in Tempe.

    The Gov addressed a variety of topics: his business-friendly jobs creation plan, health care, immigration, social security, the election of Republican businessman Bob Turner in New York’s 9th district, and more.

    Reuters – Tim Gaynor

    Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney won support from business leaders in Arizona on Wednesday, pledging to cap government regulation and free up American business to get the country out of recession.

    “We have to be honest about the challenges we have, deal with them directly, create the certainty that enterprise requires, then stand back and watch the American entrepreneur and businesses do what they have done over the last couple of hundred years, which is grow, hire and be profitable,” Romney told around 40 executives gathered at a Tucson Ford dealership.

    Romney, who made a fortune running a private equity investment firm, set out a plan to kick start the economy by capping regulation, cutting healthcare costs and streamlining the immigration process to allow skilled, legal immigrants to boost competitiveness.

    “I am devoted to making America the most attractive place in the world for business, for jobs to grow, for incomes to grow,” he said.

    Romney also took a swipe at what he described as Democratic President Barack Obama’s failure to achieve economic recovery through stimulus spending.
    […]
    What’s wrong in America right now is not going to be cured by a little cup of gasoline on the fire,” Romney said.

    “We need to fundamentally reshape the foundation of our economy and its relationship with government so that businesses are once again … incentivized to invest in America and to grow here.”

    Romney talks with FOX 10′s Steve Krafft:

    One-on-One with Presidential Hopeful Mitt Romney: MyFoxPHOENIX.com

    Romney takes CEO message to car dealer in Arizona – Garrett Haake

    TUCSON, Ariz.
    [...]
    In response to a question on the topic of immigration reform — an important issue in this border state — and Gov. Rick Perry’s position on offering in-state tuition for the children of illegal immigrants, Romney noted that this was an area in which he disagreed with Perry, but that he himself was strongly in favor of legal immigration — with highly skilled immigrants or those with advanced degrees moving to the front of the line.

    In a nod to his host, local car dealer and major GOP donor and kingmaker Jim Click, who also hosted a luncheon for Romney later in the day, the former Massachusetts governor compared structural health-care cost problems to the car business.

    “It’d be like in the automobile business if the customer came in and they paid $1,000 dollars — and that was it, that was effectively their deductible,” he said. “They pay $1,000 dollars and after that it’s free. They can get any car they want. They pay $1,000 dollars and after that it’s free, paid for by someone else. And then the sales person, they get a commission based on the more automobile they give you,” Romney said, describing the pay-for-service model of healthcare. “So we’d all be driving Ferraris and Rolls Royces. That’s what happened in health care, and we’ve got to change that.”
    [...]
    Romney also weighed in on last night’s special-election results in New York and Nevada. He pointed a questioner to Dan Senor’s op-ed in the Wall Street Journal this morning, which suggests President Obama (and by extension other democratic candidates) are losing the Jewish vote for what Senor (a Romney foreign policy advisor) considers to be Obama’s “one-sided” relationship with Israel.

    (emphasis added)

    In a local news interview, Romney explains his qualifications as a leader in the private sector, and outlines his campaign plans for Arizona:

    More…

    Romney, fresh from a fundraising luncheon, was buoyed by a crowd estimated to be nearly 800 strong — mostly seniors, whose parked cars stretched for block after manicured block here in the Sun Lakes golf and retirement community near Phoenix. It was perhaps the largest, friendliest Romney crowd of the campaign season, which one Romney aide said showed the candidate’s strength in Arizona[...]

    The former governor of Massachusetts stung his biggest rival, Rick Perry of Texas, on issues likely to carry more than a little water in this now early-voting, senior-heavy, border state: Social Security and immigration.

    On Social Security, Romney joked, “You may have watched the debate. It came out in a big way.”

    “Social Security is not a Ponzi scheme,” Romney began telling a questioner, to the laughter and approval approval of the crowd. “Social Security has worked for 75 years pretty darn well. You guys have not taken advantage of Social Security; you contributed to it. It’s a savings plan, a pension plan. There are no bad guys in Social Security, so I don’t call it a Ponzi scheme.”

    But Romney, who said he wouldn’t touch the plan for current seniors, admitted the funding system would need changes in the long term to keep it solvent for younger generations. How would he accomplish this?

    “No.1, we’re not going to change it by sending it back to the states. Gov. Perry, in his book, said: ‘Look, it’s unconstitutional at the federal level, give it back to the states,’” he said. “Look, you can’t have people who move from state to state to state having different plans state to state. I wouldn’t want the state legislatures raiding the trust funds of Social Security state by state. It needs to be a federal entitlement. I will save Social Security as a federal program and as a federal entitlement.”


    ► Jayde Wyatt

    Social Security: Is Rick Perry FED UP! Or Not?




    Mitt Romney (GOP Candidates Debate, Tampa, FL, 9/12/11):

    “I put in my book a series of proposals on how to get [Social Security] on sound financial footing so that our kids could count on it, not just our current seniors. But the real question is: Does Governor Perry continue to believe that Social Security should not be a federal program, that it’s unconstitutional and it should be returned to the states? Or is he going to retreat from that view?”

    Is Perry’s position on Social Security what he wrote in Fed Up!?

    Perry, In Fed Up!: “Social Security is something that we’ve been forced to accept for more than 70 years now … at the expense of respect for the Constitution and limited government.” (Rick Perry, Fed Up!, 2010, p. 50)

    Perry: “By any measure, Social Security is a failure.” (Rick Perry, Fed Up, 2010, p. 62)

    Is it what he said on his book tour last year?

    Perry: “Get it back to the states. Why is the federal government even in the pension program…? Let the states do it.”

    PERRY: “When you look at Social Security, it’s broke. … Get it back to the states. Why is the federal government even in the pension program or the health care delivery program? Let the states do it. … That, I will suggest to you, is one of the ways this federal government can get out of our business, save a lot of money and get back to that Constitutional way of doing business in those enumerated powers that they’re supposed to have.” (MSNBC’s “Morning Joe,” 11/5/10)

    Perry: “Let the states … run the pensions.”

    PERRY: “There’s a number of things in that book that will strike Americans as horrifying. And we must, as a people, get put back in the box. Get this government back to the limited form that our founding fathers sought. Let the states, whether it is how to run Medicaid, how to run the pensions.” (FOX’s “On The Record With Greta Van Susteren,” 11/8/10)

    Perry called Social Security a program “THAT WE DON’T NEED.”

    PERRY: “I think every program needs to stand the sunshine of righteous scrutiny. Whether it’s Social Security, whether it’s Medicaid, whether it’s Medicare. You’ve got $115 trillion worth of unfunded liability in those three. … And I think we should have a legitimate, honest, national discussion about Washington’s continuing to spend money we don’t have on programs that we don’t need.” (Andrew Romano, “Rick Perry On The Record,” The Daily Beast, 8/12/11)

    Now, he’s changed his mind? Here’s his latest opinion:

    On September 12, 2011, Perry wrote that “America’s goal must be to fix Social Security” so Americans “really can count on [it] for the long haul.”

    “America’s goal must be to fix Social Security by making it more financially sound and sustainable for the long term. … Americans must come together and agree to address the problems so today’s beneficiaries and tomorrow’s retirees really can count on Social Security for the long haul.”(Rick Perry, Op-Ed, “I Am Going To Be Honest With The American People,” USA Today, 9/12/11)

    Now, that’s a switch…



    ► Jayde Wyatt

    Romney Fundraiser in Denver: Recap and Full Video

    Denver, Colorado

    Directly on the heels of receiving a second round of Colorado endorsements, Mitt Romney held a luncheon fundraiser in downtown Denver on Friday. I was fortunate enough to be among the 100 or so attendees to hear Governor Romney give about a 15 minute speech and then take several questions from audience members.

    Many of the state’s public officials who have endorsed Mitt were there including Attorney General John Suthers and Secretary of State Scott Gessler. Mark DeMoss was a surprise guest at the event. He is the founder of the DeMoss Group, an evangelical Christian public relations firm out of Atlanta.

    Mitt began by talking about his experience in the last GOP debate at the Reagan Library in Simi Valley, California. Much of the rest of his speech was spent stressing his economic credentials, touting American exceptionalism, and pointing out President Obama’s failures in office. Mitt did not hesitate to call out Rick Perry during the Q&A session for labeling social security “a ponzi scheme”. Romney referenced to his book, No Apology, for possible solutions to the issue, but the main point was that social security should be saved not ended. It appears that this is an issue Mitt and other Republican candidates will try to use against Governor Perry.

    Mitt was sharp and on top of his game as usual. The speech was full of stories, facts, insights, and a good dose of self-deprecating humor. Every time I hear him speak I am even more convinced that this is the man who should be leading our country. No one else in this presidential race possesses the combination of knowledge and successful experience that Mitt has.

    Please enjoy the videos I filmed at the fundraiser. I apologize if the picture is a little shaky at times. My arm was just a little bit cramped after holding my phone in that position for 15 and 20 minutes at a time.

    The Speech

    The Q&A

    Questions asked during Q&A:
    1) What are your thoughts on card check, labor unions, and right to work?
    2) How can we make sure budget cuts are to unnecessary administrators and not essential services?
    3) What is your reaction to Obama’s jobs speech?
    4) How do you let the average American know you are for the middle class?
    5) What do you think of Governor Perry’s stance on social security?
    6) What will the first week of a Romney administration look like?

    Rick Perry Says Social Security Shouldn’t Exist on Federal Level, Romney Says Fix It

    Gov Mitt Romney and Gov Rick Perry spar at the GOP presidential debate held at the Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, CA on September 7, 2011. (Photo AP/Jae C. Hong)

    It’s the hot issue politicos are buzzing about…

    At the GOP presidential debate this week, Rick Perry’s comments that “social security is a ponzi scheme” and Mitt Romney’s response has caused more than a few eyebrows to knit together. The subject will surely be pursued at the next debate on Monday in Tampa, FL, and may well be a defining issue throughout the entire campaign. For these reasons, we bring you a few opinions we’ve heard in the last couple of days.

    Former NH governor John Sununu offered his critique of the debate (and Obama’s jobs creation speech):

    Washington Post

    Former New Hampshire governor John Sununu never lacked for candor, not in his home state nor when he served as chief of staff in the George H.W. Bush administration.

    In a telephone interview, he told me that he was “a little surprised” Texas Gov. Rick Perry wasn’t better prepared on the Social Security question during Wednesday’s Reagan Library debate. “I got a little worried for him. If he is the nominee, the Democrats are going to have a silver bullet. I would have thought he’d have a strategy to mend what’s in the book,” he said in reference to Perry’s “Fed Up!”

    Former NH Governor John Sununu

    Sununu said he has narrowed down his nominee choice to Perry or Mitt Romney and will make up his mind in mid- to late October after a series of debates. Why not former Utah governor Jon Huntsman? “He’s too in love with President Obama,” he said bluntly. “He’s got to get the courage to . . . join the rest of the Republicans to talk about the problems this president has caused.” He also found Huntsman’s remark on “nation-building at home” to be “ridiculous.”

    As for President Obama’s jobs speech, Sununu thought the somewhat-angry tone stemmed from a desire to “have enough energy in the speech. It was an ‘I’m back from Martha’s Vineyard’ attitude.”
    [...]
    As for the New Hampshire primary, Sununu explained that voters in the state “are willing to sacrifice a little on personal ideology” in order to find the most electable candidate, because they are “petrified of this president.” Sununu warned the presidential candidates that voters there are looking for substance. “There has to be sufficient detail to contrast with the policies that haven’t worked,” he said.
    [...]

    Governor Chris Christie on ‘ponzi scheme’ Perry:
    September 8, 2011

    LAMBERTVILLE – Gov. Chris Christie sides with his northern – not southern – neighbor in the latest prez flap over Social Security.

    In last night’s presidential debate, Texas Gov. Rick Perry called Social Security a Ponzi scheme and a failure, setting up a flashpoint moment with former Mass. Gov. Mitt Romney, who said the federal program wasn’t a failure but needs to be fixed.

    “I’m going to let them have their fight,” Christie told reporters here, “but in general it’s incorrect to say that Social Security is a failure. I would disagree with that statement.”

    Congresswoman Michele Bachmann had this to say:
    September 9, 2011

    Without naming names but clearly targeting Rick Perry, Rep. Michele Bachmann told Radio Iowa that lawmakers have to “keep faith” with current Social Security beneficiaries.

    Said Bachmann: “That’s wrong for any candidate to make senior citizens believe that they should be nervous about something they have come to count on.

    During an appearance on FOX & Friends Weekend this morning, Mike Huckabee was asked for his opinion on Perry’s ‘ponzi scheme’ stance and Governor Romney’s position at the presidential debate. Several MRC supporters, including myself, looked for the video. We found it, but the Romney segment was not included. In a nutshell, Huckabee basically said Perry’s wording was wrong and that Mitt had it right.

    Today On FOX News Watch, conservative radio talk show host Tammy Bruce and Democratic campaign consultant Doug Schoen both agreed that Perry’s words on social security at the debate, and the impression he left, was detrimental to him. Schoen said it was definitely an issue for Perry – possibly lethal. Bruce commented that it was the impression Perry left – that people won’t elect a bully.




    In his book Fed Up, Rick Perry questions the existence of social security:

    “Perry Is Saying Things In This Campaign That No Presidential Candidate Has Said In Decades, Not The Least Of Which Is An Unrelenting Attack On Social Security.” (Paul Burka, “Not Like Other Politicians,” Texas Monthly, 8/30/11)

    Despite his campaign’s efforts to separate the candidate and his position, Perry’s approach to social security is clear…


    Perry does not believe social security should exist. He asks: “Why Is The Federal Government Even In The Pension Program…? Let The States Do It.” PERRY: “When you look at Social Security, it’s broke. … Get it back to the states. Why is the federal government even in the pension program or the health care delivery program? Let the states do it. … That, I will suggest to you, is one of the ways this federal government can get out of our business, save a lot of money and get back to that Constitutional way of doing business in those enumerated powers that they’re supposed to have.” (MSNBC’s “Morning Joe,” 11/5/10)

    Perry: “By Any Measure, Social Security Is A Failure.” (Rick Perry, Fed Up, P. 62, 2010)

    • “Rick Perry Describes Social Security As A ‘Violent’ Attack On Core American Values.” (Maggie Haberman And Alexander Burns, “Perry Book A Treasure Trove For Foes,” Politico, 9/2/11)

    Perry: “I Challenge Anybody To Stand Up And Defend The Social Security Program That We Have Today.” (Andrew Romano, “Rick Perry On The Record,” The Daily Beast, 8/12/11)

    Perry: “We Must … Get This Government Back To The Limited Form That Our Founding Fathers Sought. Let The States [Decide] How To Run The Pensions.” PERRY: “There’s a number of things in that book that will strike Americans as horrifying. And we must, as a people, get put back in the box. Get this government back to the limited form that our founding fathers sought. Let the states, whether it is how to run Medicaid, how to run the pensions.” (Fox’s “On The Record With Greta Van Susteren,” 11/8/10)

    Regarding social security, Perry doesn’t “think our Founding Fathers … were thinking about a Federally operated program of pensions…” PERRY: “I don’t think our founding fathers when they were putting the term “general welfare” in there were thinking about a federally operated program of pensions nor a federally operated program of health care. What they clearly said was that those were issues that the states need to address. Not the federal government.” (Andrew Romano, “Rick Perry On The Record,” The Daily Beast, 8/12/11)

    Perry hasn’t “backed off anything” in his book:
    In Fed Up!, Perry says social security is in place “at the expense of respect for the Constitution.” “Social Security is something that we’ve been forced to accept for more than 70 years now. […] at the expense of respect for the Constitution and limited government.” (Rick Perry, Fed Up!, 2010, p. 50)

    Perry: “I haven’t backed off anything in my book.” “[Perry] threw cold water on his own campaign’s efforts to portray his [Social Security] position in a more tempered light. ‘I haven’t backed off anything in my book. So read the book again and get it right,’ he said.” (Michael Muskal, “Rick Perry Sticks To Claim That Social Security Is A Scam,” Los Angeles Times, 8/29/11)
    (emphasis added)




    Check out Governor Romney’s new flier here.



    ► Jayde Wyatt